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Animation Wins Competition to Communicate the Impact of #landarch on Well-Being

Congratulations to Lovisa Kjerrgren, who won the 2015 Wayne Grace Memorial Student Competition with her short animation entitled “Pretty Heroic.” The competition and its $10,000 USD prize was sponsored by the Landscape Architectural Registration Boards Foundation. Entrants had to develop a communications piece that effectively conveys the vital role that landscape architects play in protecting and enhancing the public’s well-being, as identified in the “Definition of Welfare” research conducted by the Council of Landscape Architectural Registration Boards (CLARB).

In the winning animation, the characters’ lives are enhanced by the work done by landscape architects, shown wearing capes in one scene. From the dialogue:

“Landscape architects may not have super powers, but they have the knowledge, skills and passion it takes to design environments that promote the welfare of you and your fellow members of the public for today and the future, and that is pretty heroic.”


kjerrgren-150wWinner Lovisa Kjerrgren

Born and raised in Stockholm, Sweden, Lovisa recently graduated with a Master of Landscape Architecture degree from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. When asked how she settled on landscape architecture as a career, she said, “For me, it’s all about the dynamic combination of having the elements of art and creativity and marrying that with science, knowing that this really relates to people’s lives and the environment we live in.” Lovisa said the biggest challenge in creating the animation was scaling it back to be concise without losing the message she wanted to deliver.

LAF was honored to serve on the five-member jury of landscape architecture and communications professionals who unanimously selected Kjerrgren’s entry as the winner. The jury members were:

  • Stephanie Landregan, FASLA, LARBF Chair and CLARB Past President
  • Kenneth Backman, FASLA, LARBF Past Chair, CLARB Past President
  • Terry Poltrack, Director of Public Relations and Communications, American Society of Lanscape Architects
  • Barbara Deutsch, FASLA, Executive Director, Landscape Architecture Foundation
  • Jim Brown, Trail Development Manager, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (and 2012 LAF Olmsted Scholar)

Sustaining Nature and Natural Processes in Ultra-Urban Environments

On April 16 the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF) and DeepRoot co-hosted a conversation and charrette at the SvR offices in Seattle. The theme was “Cities need nature, and nature needs cities: How and where do you struggle to bring nature to the built environment?” The goal was to better understand the opportunities and challenges to integrating nature into cities at every stage in the process, from conception and design to construction and maintenance.

The 20 attendees were a diverse cross section of landscape architects, engineers, arborists, and academics. The rich discussion delved into places that are problematic for ‘normal nature’, such as streetscapes, on structure, plazas, and transit. By examining what it takes to sustain natural processes in these highly-urbanized environments, the conversation went beyond the concerns of any one discipline and into the broader realm of what makes for the most successful public spaces.


DeepRoot is working to put together several videos and blog posts based on the day’s discussion. The first one on the history of the word “parking” will be available soon.  Stay tuned for more over the coming weeks!

[6/1 UPDATE] The first products are now available:


Meet the 2014 National Olmsted Scholar and Finalists: The Undergraduates

The Landscape Architecture Foundation’s Olmsted Scholars Program is the premier national award and recognition program for landscape architecture students. The program honors students with exceptional leadership potential who are using ideas, influence, communication, service, and leadership to advance sustainable design and foster human and societal benefits.

Here, we showcase the 2014 undergraduate winner and finalists, who were announced last spring. An independent jury of leaders in the landscape architecture profession selected them from a group of 30 undergraduate students nominated by their faculty for being exceptional student leaders. The winner receives the $15,000 undergraduate prize and each finalist receives $1,000.

All of the 2014 Olmsted Scholars will be honored at LAF’s Annual Benefit in Denver on November 21. We hope to se you there!


National Olmsted Scholar Erin Percevault of Louisiana State University

Erin discusses her research looking at how renewable energy technologies and policies affect landscape and communities.


Finalist Blythe Worstell of the Ohio State University

In this slideshow, Blythe shares how travel, service, and her rustbelt upbringing have shaped her design interests.


Finalist Clemente Rico of Arizona State University

Clemente discusses his belief that landscape architecture can be an agent for social and environmental justice and his work to develop future designers.


Finalist Viviana Castro of the University of Florida

In this slideshow, Viviana shares her experiences abroad and discusses plans to return to Bogota, Columbia to share her capstone research and visions for rediscovering the Fucha River. 

Sustainability at Home: CSI Takes Its First Look at Private Single-Family Residences

By Pamela Blackmore, BLA, Christopher Binder, MLA Candidate, and Bo Yang, PhD, Assistant Professor, Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning, Utah State University

Over two dozen project types are featured in the Landscape Performance Series Case Study Briefs, representing landscapes from public parks and streetscapes to plazas and even zoos. Yet, despite such a prolific range, none have documented one of the most widespread and accessible applications of sustainable design for both the general public and the professional landscape architect: the single-family home. This summer, our Case Study Investigation (CSI) research team is helping tackle this new and exciting territory by investigating three privately-owned, single-family landscapes created by the firm, Design Workshop in Aspen, Colorado.

Cascade Garden: Reinventing a Landscape with Minimal Disturbance

Can a landscape architect transform a residential lot into a completely different space without destroying existing plant material, disrupting the soil, or waiting years for new, young trees to establish? The site design for this property accomplishes exactly that by utilizing a number of simple but effective techniques that strive to create a new landscape that retains the economic, environmental, and social benefits of the landscape that had been there for years. Our investigation sought to quantify these benefits through innovative methods that include assessing the value of retained or transplanted trees, determining the advantages of siting the new home on the old home’s footprint, and understanding the habitat and water quality effects of deepening rather than expanding the pond.

Riverside Ranch: Restoring Nature and History

Restoring this brownfield site from an industrial asphalt dump to a functional wetland ecosystem was no easy task. To complete the property with a quad of historical and accurately refurbished buildings dating from the 1800s was even more challenging. While restoration was the driving principle in this design, an equally important goal was to establish trout habitat. To determine how successful the design is in creating a veritable ‘fisherman’s paradise’ we explored the streams, ponds, and riparian zones created on site, delving into questions of water quality and habitat suitability.

Capitol Valley Ranch: Creating Microclimates with Natural Energy

This high-altitude landscape was conceived of as a series of outdoor living areas that take advantage of passive solar heating and sun/shade relationships to transition seamlessly with the interior of the home, a sort of modern take on the classical indoor-outdoor relationship of the quintessential Italian villa. The primary challenge for the research team in quantifying the relative success of this design approach was measuring the various factors (temperature, wind speed, relative humidity) that contribute to human comfort levels. Our approach began with selecting 66 individual points around the property at which to measure each environmental factor, then monitoring each point three times throughout the day in order to understand which areas are most comfortable during peak use times in the morning, afternoon, and evening. After gathering the data, the team assembled the information into a GIS that plotted the relative comfort of each point on a physical map of the property, allowing for a thorough bioclimatic analysis of the landscape.


Veteran Research Fellow Bo Yang, returning Research Assistant Pamela Blackmore and newcomer graduate student Christopher Binder are participating in LAF’s 2013 Case Study Investigation (CSI) program and exploring new methods to document the performance of three private residences in Aspen, Colorado.

New LAF Website Goes Live!

Yes, you are in the right place — assuming that you were looking for the Landscape Architecture Foundation’s website, that is. After an intensive 6-month design and development process, our new website is finally up and running! LAF sends out a huge thank you to TOKY Branding + Design whose knowledge, creativity, professionalism, and patience kept the whole process on track and were essential in developing this amazing resource.

We hope you like our new look and streamlined structure. Best of all, this powerful new infrastructure supports our latest initiative, the Landscape Performance Series, which, with your participation, will become a hub for dialogue on sustainable landscape solutions.

The new components we’re most excited about include:

Please add your comments to the content, or drop us a line at to let us know what you think.

We’re still adding content and troubleshooting, so we appreciate your patience over the next few weeks. Keep checking back as we continue adding resources to the Landscape Performance Series and information on past scholarship winners and projects.