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Communicate the Impact of Landscape Architecture on Public Well-Being, Win $10,000

An important aspect of landscape performance is the impact landscapes have on the public’s well-being; yet the general public doesn’t have a clear understanding of what this means to them in everyday life.

That’s where you could play a role. Our friends at the Council of Landscape Architectural Registration Boards (CLARB) are seeking entries for the Landscape Architectural Registration Boards Foundation’s 2015 Wayne Grace Memorial Student Competition. The challenge: effectively communicate the vital role that landscape architects play in protecting and enhancing “public welfare”. The prize: $10,000!

This is not a typical student design competition. CLARB’s research on “Landscape Architecture and Public Welfare”, establishes seven key impacts that the landscape architecture projects have on public welfare. To enter the competition, pick one (or more!) of the impacts and create a communication piece (infographic, pamphlet, video, etc) that can be easily shared with the public.

waynegracebuttonEntries are due May 31. Entries are not limited by format and will be judged on:

  • Ease of sharing with the general public
  • Creativity
  • Clarity
  • Conciseness
  • Persuasiveness

The competition is open to junior and senior undergraduate or graduate students in landscape architecture. Entries may be submitted by individuals or groups; for group entries, students in other disciplines may be members of the group, but a landscape architecture student must submit the entry.

Learn more about the competition at: clarb.org/waynegrace
Download the full Landscape Architecture and Public Welfare report (PDF)
Download the Executive Summary (PDF)

2015 Landscape Performance Education Grant Recipients Announced

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As landscape architects are increasingly engaged to address complex challenges like climate change, urbanization, and public health, it is critical that they be able to communicate the measurable benefits of design solutions. Therefore, landscape architecture students need awareness and the technical skills to predict outcomes, assess alternatives, defend design proposals, and evaluate the environmental, economic, and social performance of landscape projects.

LAF’s Landscape Performance Education Grants allow select university faculty to develop and test models for integrating landscape performance into standard landscape architecture course offerings. Five $2,500 mini-grants were awarded to these faculty members for the Spring 2015:

  • Kenneth Brooks, FASLA, FCELA, PLA, Arizona State University
    Advanced Landscape Architecture Studio IV (MLA Studio) and Special Topic: Design Performance (MLA Seminar)
    In the studio course, each student will develop a systematic performance assessment of their design to illustrate how the proposal accommodates a program and site. In the seminar course, students will use their studio projects as the basis for developing and demonstrating design performance assessment.
  • Ellen Burke, PLA, LEED AP, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
    Project Design and Implementation Focus Studio (BLA Studio)
    This upper-division studio will teach an understanding of landscape as a living system. Through a combination of research, program design and quantification assignments, students will be asked to choose and design a ‘performative’ landscape and to understand and describe their proposals through the lens of landscape performance.
  • Reid Coffman, PhD, Kent State University
    Urban Ecological Systems (MLA, MArch, MUD Joint-seminar)
    In this cross-disciplinary graduate seminar, students will conceptualize green infrastructure applications and, using various calculators, determine before and after scenario performances in various categorical areas: hydrology, energy, nutrients, biological diversity, and human health.
  • Yi Luo, PhD, Texas Tech University
    Landscape Architecture Design Process
    (BLA Studio and Lecture)
    As the first BLA design studio course at Texas Tech, it familiarizes students with the typical design process of a landscape project. Background information on landscape performance will be taught, followed by the design process of a landscape, and concluding with student projects that utilize methods learned and quantify potential performance benefits.
  • Emily Vogler, Rhode Island School of Design
    Site Analysis and Planning (MLA Seminar)
    Through weekly lectures, workshops and field exercises, this course will cover both the theory and techniques of site analysis and planning. Students will learn how to measure, analyze and map physical, biological and social attributes on a site, as well as synthesize site specific data into design solutions.

Grant recipients will work with LAF throughout the duration of the classes and use formal course evaluations to determine the success and replicability of the teaching models used. Course materials developed through the Landscape Performance Education Grants will be added to the Resources for Educators section of LandscapePerformance.org, which offers teaching tools like syllabi, reading lists, and assignments for faculty members interested in teaching landscape performance to the next generation of design professionals.icpifoundation-new

The Landscape Performance Education Grants are made possible with support from the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute’s Foundation for Education & Research. A total of ten $2,500 grants have been awarded in 2014 and 2015.

LAF Offers Second Round of Landscape Performance Education Grants

To accelerate the adoption of landscape performance in design education, LAF is offering five $2,500 mini-grants to select university faculty for the Spring 2015. Participating faculty will work with LAF to develop and test models for integrating landscape performance into standard landscape architecture course offerings, such as research and methods, site planning and analysis, design studios, and other lecture or seminar courses.

studioApplications are now available and will be due Nov 14, 2014. Each application is to include a teaching proposal, which will be evaluated for quality and feasibility by LAF and an independent committee of educators. Grant recipients will be announced in early December.

Download Grant Application

Grant recipients will work closely with LAF and its Education Committee to finalize the teaching proposals, which will then be implemented during the Spring 2015 semester/term. Formal course evaluations will be used to determine the success and replicability of the teaching models tested, including whether specific landscape performance learning objectives are met.

Course materials developed through the Landscape Performance Education Grants are housed in the Resources for Educators section on the LAF website, which offers teaching tools like syllabi, reading lists, and assignments for faculty members interested in teaching landscape performance to the next generation of design professionals. Materials produced from the first round of mini-grants can be found there.

icpifoundation-newThis initiative is made possible by the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute’s Foundation for Education & Research, whose support will allow LAF to award a total of $25,000 in grants to educators, with five grants made in the 2013-2014 academic year and five in 2014-2015.

2014 Landscape Performance Education Grant Recipients Announced

In today’s increasingly evidence-based marketplace, landscape architecture students need to be able to convey the environmental, economic, and social value of excellent design. Incorporating landscape performance into the curriculum will give students the awareness and skills they need to design for, evaluate, and communicate the impact of their projects.

lp-whiteboardLAF’s Landscape Performance Education Grants allow select faculty to develop and test models for integrating landscape performance into standard landscape architecture course offerings. For 2014, five $2,500 grants have been awarded to the following faculty for their proposed classes:

  • Aidan Ackerman, Boston Architectural College
    Ecological Analysis & Conceptual Frameworks (MLA Studio)
  • Gary Austin, PLA, University of Idaho
    Water Conservation Technologies (BSLA Lecture)
  • Kenneth Brooks, FASLA, FCELA, PLA, Arizona State University
    Advanced Landscape Architecture Studio IV (MLA Studio) and Special Topic: Design Performance (MLA Seminar)
  • Chuo Li, PhD, Mississippi State University
    Landscape Architecture Graduate Studio II: Health (MLA Studio)
  • Mary Myers, PhD, FASLA, FCELA, Temple University
    Seminar on Landscape Performance: Focus on Temple University Main Campus Landscape (MLA/BSLASeminar)

The selection process for the 2014 grants was competitive, with applications received from faculty at universities across the U.S. The teaching proposals include studio, lecture, and seminar courses for both BLA and MLA curricula.

Students will learn about landscape performance from a variety of angles, such as stormwater management, public health, energy conservation and social cohesion. Many of the courses integrate performance metrics directly into the design process, with students setting objectives and developing metrics to evaluate the projected performance of their studio projects. In other cases, students will apply various tools and methods to measure benefits to inform design scenarios for external “real world” projects.

Grant recipients will work with LAF throughout the duration of the classes and use formal course evaluations to determine the success and replicability of the teaching models used. Course materials developed through the Landscape Performance Education Grants will form the basis of a new “Resources for Educators” section on the LAF website, which will offer teaching tools like syllabi, reading lists, and assignments for faculty members interested in teaching landscape performance to the next generation of design professionals.

The Landscape Performance Education Grants are made possible with support from the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute’s Foundation for Education & Research. Five additional $2,500 awards will be made for the 2014-2015 academic year, with proposals accepted starting next fall.

LAF to Offer Landscape Performance Education Grants

To prepare for the professional challenges and opportunities of an increasingly evidence-based marketplace, landscape architecture students need awareness, skills, and resources to be able to design for, evaluate, and communicate landscape performance. Yet landscape performance — using metrics to convey the environmental, economic, and social value of excellent design — is not yet an established part of the educational curriculum.

lp-whiteboardTo accelerate the adoption of landscape performance in design education, LAF is offering five $2,500 mini-grants to select university faculty for the Spring 2014. Participating faculty will work with LAF to develop and test one or more models for integrating landscape performance into standard landscape architecture course offerings, such as research and methods, site planning and analysis, design studios, and other lecture or seminar courses.

Download Grant Application

Applications will be due Oct 31, 2013. Each application is to include a teaching proposal, which will be evaluated for quality and feasibility by LAF and an independent committee of educators. Grant recipients will be announced in November 2013.

Grant recipients will work closely with LAF and its Education Committee to finalize the teaching proposals, which will then be implemented during the Spring 2014 semester/term. Formal course evaluations will be used to determine the success and replicability of the teaching models tested, including whether specific landscape performance learning objectives are met.icpifoundation

This initiative is made possible by the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute’s Foundation for Education & Research, whose support will allow LAF to award a total of $25,000 in grants to educators, with five grants made in the 2013-2014 academic year and five in 2014-2015.

Course materials developed through the Landscape Performance Education Grants will form the basis of a new “Resources for Educators” section on the LAF website, which will include assignments, syllabi and other resources to help bring landscape performance into the classroom to better prepare the next generation of design professionals.