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LAF Research Initiatives Win Two 2015 ASLA Professional Awards


Two of the Landscape Architecture Foundation’s signature programs have been honored with American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) 2015 Professional Awards, which recognize top public, commercial, residential, institutional, planning, communications, and research projects from across the U.S. and around the world. This year, ASLA received 459 entries for these prestigious awards.

The Landscape Performance Series received the 2015 Award of Excellence in Communications, the highest honor in this category. The Landscape Performance Series was developed to build capacity to achieve sustainability and transform the way landscape is valued in the design and development process. Redesigned and launched in 2014 as, this unparalleled platform showcases the measurable environmental, social, and economic benefits of landscape and has become a go-to place to find design precedents, show value, and make the case for sustainable landscape solutions.

                                   “It’s a living document essential to our profession.”
                                                              — 2015 Awards Jury

LAF’s Case Study Investigation (CSI) program received a 2015 Honor Award in Research, co-presented by ASLA and the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture. CSI is a unique research collaboration that matches faculty-student research teams with leading design practitioners to measure and document the performance of their built projects as Landscape Performance Series Case Study Briefs. To date, 30 faculty, 35 students, and 57 design firms have participated, resulting in the publication of over 100 case studies.

                       “The more we say that measuring performance over the long haul
                                    is part of what we do, the more it’s going to happen.”
                                                              — 2015 Awards Jury

“We are thrilled to see our research programs achieve this level of recognition in the profession.” said LAF Executive Director Barbara Deutsch, FASLA. “Our work to promote landscape performance is changing the way landscape architects practice and the way others understand and appreciate the value of landscape solutions.”

The awards will be presented at the ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in Chicago on Monday, November 9 at McCormick Place. The complete list of award winners — along with project information, images, and criteria — can be viewed at:

Animation Wins Competition to Communicate the Impact of #landarch on Well-Being

Congratulations to Lovisa Kjerrgren, who won the 2015 Wayne Grace Memorial Student Competition with her short animation entitled “Pretty Heroic.” The competition and its $10,000 USD prize was sponsored by the Landscape Architectural Registration Boards Foundation. Entrants had to develop a communications piece that effectively conveys the vital role that landscape architects play in protecting and enhancing the public’s well-being, as identified in the “Definition of Welfare” research conducted by the Council of Landscape Architectural Registration Boards (CLARB).

In the winning animation, the characters’ lives are enhanced by the work done by landscape architects, shown wearing capes in one scene. From the dialogue:

“Landscape architects may not have super powers, but they have the knowledge, skills and passion it takes to design environments that promote the welfare of you and your fellow members of the public for today and the future, and that is pretty heroic.”


kjerrgren-150wWinner Lovisa Kjerrgren

Born and raised in Stockholm, Sweden, Lovisa recently graduated with a Master of Landscape Architecture degree from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. When asked how she settled on landscape architecture as a career, she said, “For me, it’s all about the dynamic combination of having the elements of art and creativity and marrying that with science, knowing that this really relates to people’s lives and the environment we live in.” Lovisa said the biggest challenge in creating the animation was scaling it back to be concise without losing the message she wanted to deliver.

LAF was honored to serve on the five-member jury of landscape architecture and communications professionals who unanimously selected Kjerrgren’s entry as the winner. The jury members were:

  • Stephanie Landregan, FASLA, LARBF Chair and CLARB Past President
  • Kenneth Backman, FASLA, LARBF Past Chair, CLARB Past President
  • Terry Poltrack, Director of Public Relations and Communications, American Society of Lanscape Architects
  • Barbara Deutsch, FASLA, Executive Director, Landscape Architecture Foundation
  • Jim Brown, Trail Development Manager, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (and 2012 LAF Olmsted Scholar)

New Resources to Teach Landscape Performance


Attention landscape architecture faculty preparing for the upcoming schoolyear: The Resources for Educators section of now features materials from 10 university landscape architecture courses that incorporate landscape performance. The materials include syllabi, reading lists, assignments, sample student work, and faculty reflections on their pedagogical approaches and experiences teaching landscape performance. Whether you are looking to devote a class period to landscape performance or use it as an organizing theme for the entire semester, these teaching materials provide you with some tried and tested models.

The course materials were developed through LAF’s Landscape Performance Education Grants, a program that offers $2,500 mini-grants to faculty to develop and test ways to integrate landscape performance into standard landscape architecture course offerings. Five new courses were recently added from the faculty members that participated during the Spring 2015 term. They include studio, seminar, and lecture courses, ranging from introductory to advanced.

Many landscape architecture faculty are already teaching performance in some capacity, and the concept is being increasingly embraced in academia and practice:

“In my opinion, students graduating with a landscape architecture degree must have exposure to the theories and methods regarding landscape performance, including aesthetic and ecosystem service contributions, in order to become responsible and effective designers.”
            — Kofi Boone, Associate Professor, North Carolina State University

Students also see tremendous benefit to being exposed to performance in their landscape architecture coursework:

“Learning about performance landscapes is beneficial to our education, and I think it should be taught more due to the state of our planet. If I had to critique any aspect of our performance studio it would be that I wish we could have done more with it. There need to be more non-studio classes addressing landscape performance.”
          — Wayne Nemec, Third-Year BLA Student, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo

LAF is committed to helping the next generation of design professionals obtain the knowledge and technical skills they need to measure and communicate the environmental, economic, and social impact of landscape solutions. The Landscape Performance Education Grants were made possible with support from the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute’s Foundation for Education & Research. A total of ten $2,500 grants were awarded in 2014 and 2015. LAF is actively pursuing funding and sponsorships to be able to continue the program in future years.

Ecological Succession and Plant Choice

By Wes Griffith, BSLA Student, and Chris Sass, Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky

While participating in LAF’s 2015 Case Study Investigation (CSI) program, many themes came to the surface, but one stood out to us as an area directly addressable by landscape architects. That theme is the issue of ecological succession and plant choice. Ecological succession describes how ecosystems change over time, sometimes in a predicable manner, but not always. So how do we as landscape architects begin to address ecological succession through our sustainable designs and planting plans?

One of the first goals to help landscape architects think about ecological succession should be to set a long-term management plan that dictates how a landscape will be managed, including removal of invasive plants, the addition of native seed or plants, and the social dynamic of the site. Such goals were addressed in one of the projects we studied, the Lower Howard’s Creek Corridor Management Plan, which considers ecological, social and economic integrity.

A long-term management plan is necessary because succession occurs over a long time period. How long is long-term? Well for example, the second growth forest at Lower Howard’s Creek has been re-establishing since the late 1800s and we are just now starting to see some mid-successional species as early successional species are beginning to be replaced. Species such as Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana), Honey Locust (Gleditsia triacanthos) and foxtail (Seteria spp) are being replaced by oaks (Quercus spp), Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata) and Riparian Wild Rye (Elymus riparius). So how long is long-term? Definitely longer than our current 25-year project lifespan. This reminds me of the Iroquois maxim stating we need to plan for the seventh generation if we are to truly achieve sustainability.

The Coefficient of Conservatism (CoC) is a tool we can use to plan for ecological succession. CoC numbers range from 1 to 10, where lower numbers indicate a wider range of plant tolerance and higher numbers indicate a much lower range of tolerance. The later successional species mentioned above exhibit a higher CoC number, meaning they require a more specific habitat and exhibit a lower tolerance range. While it may seem like the right thing to do, using higher CoC plants in our initial planting plans is probably not the best idea. Unless we are certain — or make certain through costly amendments — that the specific habitat requirements are there, the higher CoC plants will not make it very long, and we will have wasted the plants and the opportunity. We see this mistake often in our profession. For example, a planting plan may call for Shooting Star (Dodecatheon meadia), which in many areas is endangered or threatened and has a high CoC. It is tempting to plant, but will this plant not only survive, but thrive and reproduce in a new planting area? Probably not unless the habitat is within its tolerance range.

Using the CoC, we can plan plantings by assessing the stage of succession we are designing. Higher CoC numbers will require very specific tolerance ranges and habitat types, while lower CoC numbers will be much less fussy in the landscape. Looking through some of the project planting schedules for the sites we studied, we noticed that the CoC values of plant species ranged from 1 to 10, the minimum and maximum numbers. The question becomes: What have we designed for? A highly established landscape that is fairly stable? Or one that is just beginning to establish itself at the early seral stages?

Maintenance plays an important role in how we begin to plan for successional landscape designs. We have found maintenance to be an issue at two of the sites we studied. Both college campus projects, Northern Kentucky University’s Norse Commons and the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture Alumni Plaza, used native plants, and unfortunately some of the planted species have been outcompeted.

In all, as a profession concerned with sustainable approaches, we should think beyond the 25-year mark and aim more for the century mark and beyond. Let’s be more like the Iroquois and plan for seven generations.

Research Assistant Wes Griffith and Research Fellow Chris Sass are participating in LAF’s 2015 Case Study Investigation (CSI) program and working to evaluate the environmental, economic and social performance of three sustainable landscape projects in Kentucky.

New LAF Development Manager

csanders-175wWe are delighted to announce that Christina Sanders had joined the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF) as Development Manager. In addition to her commitment to sustainable development, Christina has a notable corporate sector background in management, marketing, and sales.

Prior to joining LAF, Christina spent four years with Apple, working between Washington, D.C. and San Francisco. She held a role in business-to-business sales before joining the Apple Store Leader Program (ASLP), a competitive 24-month management training program. Upon completion of the program, she went on to excel as a manager dedicated to achieving company metrics and financial growth while simultaneously upholding Apple’s credo and ensuring employee development.

Most recently, Christina took a year to travel abroad with a philosophy to “travel slow” through countries like Laos, Vietnam, Myanmar, Morocco, and South Africa. Along with enjoying the thrill of each new place, Christina traveled intentionally in order to observe the impact of development on societies and cultures.

We are thrilled to have Christina on board!