News & Events

LAF News Blog

Stay up to date on LAF!

Subscribe to RSS Feed

Join LAF at the LA Expo Leaders' Reception

The 2014 LA Expo, a two-day trade show and educational conference in Long Beach, California, will feature a special Leaders’ Reception with all proceeds supporting Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF) research and scholarships.

parkers-lighthouseParker's Lighthouse overlooking the harbor

Join LAF on Thursday, February 13 at Parker’s Lighthouse, known for its spectacular views of Long Beach Harbor. The event starts at 6pm, and the $75 ticket includes food, live music, and a hosted bar for the first hour. The evening will include a panel discussion with leaders in landscape architecture Mia Lehrer, FASLA, Susan Goltsman, FASLA and Stephanie Landregan, FASLA. Event sponsors include: ValleyCrest Landscape Companies, IRONSMITH, Landscape Architect and Specifier News, Scofield, SWG Trees, Old Town Fiberglass, Rainbird, and USA Shade & Fabric Structures, Inc. Many thanks to the LA Expo for this opportunity.

Purchase tickets here.
View sponsorship opportunities here.

The LA Expo also features a “Complimentary Learning Lab” with LAF Executive Director Barbara Deutsch, FASLA on Friday, Feb 8 from 10-11am. Barbara will present the Landscape Performance Series, an online set of resources to quantify benefits, show value, and make the case for sustainable landscape solutions.

The LA Expo is the largest western trade show and educational conference for landscape architects, specifers, and design/build professionals. The LA Expo is produced by Landscape Communications, Inc and provides a regional venue where over 1,200 design and development professionals can exchange ideas, explore new products and technologies, and establish business relationships.

What's Next for Landscape Architecture?

whatsnext-700w

What’s Next for Landscape Architecture? LAF asked this question to attendees at the ASLA Annual Meeting EXPO in Boston. From the serious to the silly to the provocative, we got a great mix of responses from the leading practitioners, faculty, students, and others in the field. See the full range of answers on LAF’s Flickr Photostream.

We hope that your 2014 is off to a wonderful start, whatever the future holds!

ASLA Council of Fellows Adds Third Award to Annual Scholarship

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) Council of Fellows has increased the number of awards available through its annual scholarship. Up to three $4,000 awards will now be available each year to promising landscape architecture students. Each recipient also receives a one-year student ASLA membership, general registration fees for the ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO, and a travel stipend to attend the meeting.

cof-networking2013 ASLA Council of Fellows scholarhip recipients enjoy networking at the ASLA Annual Meeting (Credit: Dennis E. Bryers, FASLA, PLA)

“The Council is pleased to expand this opportunity. In addition to the financial award, this scholarship provides the exceptional opportunity to interact with the profession and its leaders by attending the Annual Meeting as a guest of honor,” said Council of Fellows Chair Susan L.B. Jacobson, FASLA.

The ASLA Council of Fellows scholarship fund was established in 2004 to increase the interest and participation of economically disadvantaged and under-represented populations in the study of landscape architecture, enriching the profession through a more diverse population. Upper-level undergraduate students enrolled in Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB) accredited programs are eligible. Full details and application information are available on the ASLA Council of Fellows Scholarships page.

The awards are part of the Leadership in Landscape Scholarship Program managed by LAF, which now offers a total of $43,500 annually through 9 different scholarships and fellowships.

Thanks for a Great Year!

The Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF) invests in research and scholarships to increase our collective capacity to achieve sustainability and cultivate the next generation of design leaders. Since 1986, LAF has awarded over $900,000 in scholarships to nearly 500 students and invested $1.8 million in research initiatives.       

josetyThanks to the generous support of LAF’s donors and sponsors, the foundation accomplished the following in 2013:

  • Awarded over $125,000 to students through scholarships, fellowships, and research assistantships.
  • Recognized 67 new Olmsted Scholars, including the first undergraduate national winner.
  • Published the 75th Landscape Performance Series (LPS) case study, documenting the environmental, economic, and social benefits of exemplary landscape projects.
  • Awarded $22,500 to researchers to analyze the LPS and develop a guidebook on metrics and methods to evaluate landscape performance.
  • Met with over 1,400 professionals through office visits, webinars, and conference presentations to increase awareness about landscape performance.

In 2014, LAF will build on this momentum with more scholarship awards, a new guidebook on evaluating landscape performance, a new webinar series, a new clearinghouse of teaching tools for landscape architecture faculty, and even more resources to help you design better and make the case for sustainable landscape solutions.

Consider investing in the Landscape Architecture Foundation in your year-end giving so that LAF can continue to deliver innovative programs and increase its impact at this critical time when the many services and talents of landscape architects are so vitally needed. Show your commitment and give back to the profession by making a tax-deductible contribution onlinemaking an honor or memorial gift, or learn about the many ways to support the Foundation.

Olmsted Scholar Feature: Climate, Water, and Infrastructure Resiliency in Phoenix

By Ashley Brenden, 2013 University Olmsted Scholar

My pH20enix Design Thesis Project evolved from current discourse on infrastructure resiliency and a United Nations report that predicts that by 2025 two out of every three people in the world will be facing water shortages. The project postulates that current trends in global climate change are likely to continue with increasing occurrences of ecological, social and economic disasters. It also asserts that global water shortage will be the largest and most far reaching ecological, social and economic disaster that humans have faced. The basis of the project lies in a clear stance that our current infrastructure is not designed to meet the increasing demands placed on our social and environmental systems. In order to withstand inevitable natural and manmade disasters, we must, as designers, be forward thinking, utilizing a hybrid of design sensibility, aesthetic appreciation, and scientific thought.

ph2oenix03Implementation was represented graphically for 8 prototypical situations along the urban canal structures.

My thesis project investigates the interrelationships of climate, water, and the urban form in Phoenix, Arizona and the implications for decision making under uncertainty. It envisions ways that Phoenix can transform into a sustainable urban model for addressing water scarcity. Progress towards sustainability of our urban environments requires careful examination of the effectiveness of dated jurisdictional and normative planning tools in dealing with contemporary urbanization concerns. By crafting zoning and policies that are more oriented towards the natural environment, we can promote a more integrated and responsive infrastructure.

The project proposes a decentralized water infrastructure configuration that makes use of existing natural and manmade infrastructure. By coupling small-scale, site-specific, decentralized water techniques with a larger-scale, integrative, above-ground canal structure a cyclical system is created that contributes to a stable environmental equilibrium. The theoretical design suggests a cyclical system in which water that is pulled into the municipal system from the Rio Salado and from Maricopa County ground sources be used, recycled, remediated and returned to the system in quantities equal to what was extracted. Site scale techniques such as water demand reduction and rainwater harvesting contribute to lower overall extraction rates.

Above-ground water canal systems that run from North Mountain to South Mountain reintroduce the natural hydrology, while collecting municipal building wastewater along the way. The system also provides microclimatic environments for social and ecological niches along its path. The canals are joined at the Rio Salado where the water is then returned to the natural circulation process, re-establishing the natural ecological habitat along the river.

ph2oenix02Canal use and program establishment were created by using an infrastructure prototype development tool and an infrastructure adjacency matrix.

The project goal was not to propose a complete solution to water shortage within the Sonoran Desert, but rather to initiate a discussion on ways to transform one of the world’s least sustainable cities into one that is a model of sustainability and resilience. The project asks “How do we design our cities to meet the needs of an increasing population in an increasingly volatile system?” and “How do we become more resilient?”.

Ashley received her Master of Landscape Architecture degree from the Arizona State University Design School in May. She currently works in Seattle as a Landscape Designer for Mithun.